A photo of people using the Tangible Landscape at the North Carolina State University Center for Geospatial Analytics

Spaces and Computing

Actionable geospatial solutions require vast spatial data and diverse teams. With an open, collaborative infrastructure and powerful computing technologies, we build community among developers and problem-solvers.

A Wide Worldview

Researchers today are armed with the largest, most thorough and highest-resolution datasets ever. At the Center for Geospatial Analytics, we’re continuously refining existing methods for gathering and evaluating location-based data. By developing groundbreaking instruments and processes, we stay on pace with and think ahead of the perpetually changing landscape of spatial data collection and application.

To remain at the forefront of this rapidly expanding field, the Center for Geospatial Analytics is home to pioneering research and teaching environments supported by high-performance computing. The leading-edge spaces and technological resources here facilitate collaborative data analysis and visualization, allowing for scenario-based decision making among researchers, educators, students and a diverse array of stakeholders.

Geovisualization Lab

Our flagship facility houses state-of-the-art tools and technologies for interacting with and accurately representing spatial data collected through research, extension and teaching. Immersive virtual environments, collaborative touch-screen displays, 3-D imagery and interactive decision-making systems allow users to visualize real-world locations and scenarios. Extensive resources including the Geovisualization Lab help attract internationally acclaimed faculty, visiting scholars and postdoctoral researchers to the Center for Geospatial Analytics.

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Earth Observation and Remote Sensing Lab

A photo of two users in the Earth Observation and Remote Sensing Lab at the North Carolina State University Center for Geospatial AnalyticsThis focused lab supports our multidimensional research into the effects of land use, water management practices and climate change on aquatic ecosystems.

The space is equipped with a wet lab for water sample preparation and leaf pigment extraction, a dry bench to support soil and vegetation measurements, a full-range handheld spectrometer to collect data in the field, and a light- and temperature-controlled room for optical studies.

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Other Learning Spaces

Experimental Classroom

This facility supports laboratory training, lectures and group project work for as many as 50 students at a time. The components in the space are easily reconfigured, and workstation and laptop screens can be shared with additional monitors wirelessly.

Graduate Offices

Resident graduate students share several open working spaces with staff and postdoctoral scholars. These newly renovated rooms include touch-enabled extended desktop displays to encourage researchers and students to share information and work in teams.

Collaboration Facility

This cutting-edge space fosters distance education and multi-site collaboration. The room is outfitted with HD cameras, built-in microphones, a 3D-4k projection system, 90-inch displays with touch capabilities and a VoIP telephone system.

Lab Preparation Area

Everything stored and maintained in this space — from survey-grade GPS devices and peripherals to collections of topographic maps and aerial photographs — can be borrowed to augment teaching, research and fieldwork activities.

Computing

The Center for Geospatial Analytics uses broad means and leading technologies to gather massive datasets of location-based information. To process it all, we take advantage of a robust, secure computing infrastructure that powers our analysis of vital geospatial data.

  • Advanced workstations: Powerful computers equipped with extra servers and memory suitable for long-term projects using large datasets and requiring interaction and visualization
  • Virtual computer labs: Two locations with reservable workstations capable of running data analyses using customized images
  • Virtual servers: Storage allowing researchers to host and share project results online
  • High-performance computing: Batch processing functionality accessible through faculty-initiated projects
  • Personal computers: Individual lab units available in graduate student offices and various workspaces