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KangJae "Jerry" Lee

Assistant Professor

Biltmore Hall (Robertson Wing) 4004

View CV 

Bio

Education

  • Ph.D. Texas A&M University, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences
  • M.S. Texas A&M University, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences
  • B.S. Kyonggi University (Republic of Korea), Tourism and Recreation

Research Interests

  • Race/ethnicity and leisure participation
  • Social inequality in access to public parks and recreation resources
  • Pierre Bourdieu’s sociological theory and leisure activities
  • Leisure and subjective well-being
  • Racism and discrimination during leisure and tourism activities
  • Serious leisure and recreational specialization
  • Intergroup contact during leisure and sport activities

Selected Publications

Lee, K. J., & Hwang, S. (Accepted). Serious leisure qualities and subjective well-being. Special Issue of Journal of Positive Psychology.

Lee, K. J., & Scott, D. (2017). Racial discrimination and African Americans’ travel behavior: The utility of habitus and vignette technique. Journal of Travel Research. 56, 381-392.

Lee, K. J., & Stodolska, M. (2016). Asian North Americans’ leisure: A critical examination of the theoretical frameworks used in research and suggestions for future study. Leisure Sciences. DOI: 10.1080/01490400.2016.1215944

Lee, K. J., & Scott, D. (2016). Bourdieu and African Americans’ park visitation: The case of Cedar Hill State Park in Texas. Leisure Sciences, 38, 424-440.

Lee, K. J., Scott, D., Floyd, M. F., & Edwards, M. (2016). Social stratification in fishing participation in the United States: a multiple hierarchy stratification perspective. Journal of Leisure Research, 48, 245-263.

Ellis, G., Lee, K. J., & Satchabut, T. (2015). Experimental designs in leisure studies. In G. Walker, D. Scott, M. Stodolska (Eds.), Leisure Matters: The State and Future of Leisure Studies (pp. 333-342). State College, PA: Venture Publishing.

Lee, K. J., Dunlap, R., & Edwards, M. (2014). The implication of Bourdieu’s theory of practice for leisure studies. Leisure Sciences, 36, 314-323.

Lee, K. J., & Scott, D. (2013). Interracial contact experience during recreational basketball and soccer: Korean American males’ perspectives. Journal of Leisure Research, 45, 267-294.

Lee, K. J., Dunlap, R., & Scott, D. (2011). Korean American males’ serious leisure experiences and their perceptions of different play styles. Leisure Sciences, 33, 290-308.

Lee, K. J., & Scott, D. (2011). Participation in wildlife watching: A multiple hierarchy stratification perspective. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 16, 330-344.

Honors and Awards

2017   Golden Apple Award in Excellent Teaching and Mentorship, College of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources, University of Missouri

2013   U.S. Senator Phil Gramm Doctoral Fellowship, Texas A&M University

2012   Diversity Scholarship, National Recreation and Park Association

2012   Scholarship, Korean American Scholarship Foundation

Media

Grants

Date: 02/02/22 - 12/31/23
Amount: $285,388.00
Funding Agencies: NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

In 2020, the NC State Park system received a record 19.8 million visitors. This increased visitation rate meant the system supported 1.2 million more visitors than in 2019 and 400,000 more than 2017, the previous record year. Although the record-high visitation in 2020 is largely attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic, which made outdoor recreation a safer and more appealing alternative compared to indoor activities, historic long-term trends show an increase in visitation to parks and outdoor areas in the state of North Carolina as well as around the country. Therefore, the NC State Parks system can likely expect a continued rise in visitation, which will require additional resources to support such visitation. Identifying and understanding potential funding options that can help support growing demands and prepare the NC State Park system for this eventuality are needed. Equity is another pressing issue for the system. Although there is increasing demand, it is necessary to acknowledge some communities in North Carolina have been historically underserved by the NC State Parks. Identifying barriers and opportunities related to park visitation can help state park managers develop strategies for more equitable park access. To continue to be relevant to future generations, it is essential that the NC State Park system foster inclusion and provide recreation opportunities for all residents of North Carolina. In sum, due to the increase in demand on the NC State Parks system resources as well as the need for more inclusive and equitable park usage for all North Carolina residents, the goal of this study is to identify pricing strategies that will support demand, promote more equitable use of NC State Parks, and contribute to more sustainable park management. This goal will be achieved through the following objectives set forth by the NC State Parks: 1. Review existing funding mechanisms and pricing strategies for other state and national recreational areas to identify a variety of options for valuing services (e.g., amenities, facilities, campground reservations, permitting fees); 2. Discern barriers to communities that have historically been underserved by the NC State Parks system, the role pricing strategies can play in limiting future use of NC State Parks by these communities, and opportunities for the parks system to be more inclusive and equitable to all North Carolina residents; 3. Identify locations and dates of high/low visitation activity to inform dynamic pricing strategies, to help reduce crowding, and to identify less visited parks that may benefit from promotion; and, 4. Establish stakeholder perceptions of pricing strategies and feasibility of application for the NC State Park system.

Date: 01/01/22 - 5/31/23
Amount: $39,694.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Interior (DOI)

Recent R3 projects focused on college students, such as Academics Afield, have demonstrated success and revealed unique opportunities for recruiting new hunters from non-traditional backgrounds (e.g., women, young adults from urban areas). However, more can be done to diversify the population of young adults who participate in these programs. In September 2021, the Georgia Wildlife Federation, working in conjunction with our NCSU team, was awarded a grant from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA) Multistate Conservation Grant Program (MSCGP) to extend and expand the effective Academics Afield program model to focus on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) across the Southeastern United States. Our team at NC State University will be helping to implement and evaluate this project. We will leverage our existing experience, infrastructure, and partnerships to identify and address the unique constraints faced by African Americans and create opportunities to make hunting and shooting sports more relevant and inclusive for students of color. In addition to increasing participation in hunting and shooting sports, this project will also help underrepresented and historically marginalized populations forge a stronger positive relationship with the outdoors, hunting, and wildlife management agencies.

Date: 11/01/20 - 10/31/22
Amount: $58,252.00
Funding Agencies: NC Tobacco Trust Fund Commission

Tourism is an important economic sector in North Carolina with strong synergies with agriculture through the supply of product to restaurants, the direct sale of product to tourists in farmers markets, and the offer of tourism experiences in farms. The purpose of this project is to further develop opportunities for farmers to tap into the tourist economy by creating direct sale of produce bags to visitors staying multiple days in a vacation rental. The concept of Vacationer Supported Agriculture (VSA) consists of coordinating the sale of weekly fractions of farm shares over the tourism season. A group of farmers decides how many farm shares they want to sell, and vacation renters are invited to pre-buy a week fraction of those shares (i.e., vacationers can buy a bag of produce from farmers local to their host destination). The project team first works with farmers and local Extension agents to define the produce bags and their delivery to the vacation rentals; then the team works with realty companies and local tourism development authorities to promote the produce bags among vacationers. Finally, the team works with an internet retail company to administer the online pre-vacation sales and the disbursement of payments to farmers and delivery micro-entrepreneurs. The VSA project also allows farmer groups from economically depressed counties contiguous to popular tourism destinations to tap into strong tourism economies, and this way it creates stronger trickle-down economic opportunity for tourism to fuel more equitable economic prosperity in the state. The VSA project was piloted in 2018 in Ocean Isle Beach under the local name “Vacation Vittles.” During the summer 2019 season VSA was further developed in Ocean Isle Beach and also piloted in 6 other beach communities. In 2020 we intend to expand VSA into the vacation markets in the Northern Outer Banks, the Crystal Coast, and the High Country near Boone. With the support of this TTF grant we intend to further develop the existing markets and scale the project across the NC coast as well as in three more targeted communities with known concentration of vacation rentals.

Date: 07/01/17 - 8/31/21
Amount: $48,966.00
Funding Agencies: National Research Foundation of Korea

The proposed study will employ a longitudinal mixed-method design to: (Aim 1) Examine the relationship among sport/recreation patterns, transnational family contacts, and subjective well-being of KTSF; (Aim 2) Examine the relationship between sport/recreation patterns of KTSF in the U.S. and their acculturation to the host society; (Aim 3) Explore how KTSF’s sport/recreation patterns evolve during the transnational period. The study will consist of two phases. The Phase 1 will include a questionnaire survey of 400 adult members of KTSF (husbands and wives) and children age 11-18 (middle school and high school age). In Phase 2, 15 families selected from among those who had participated in the survey will be asked to take part in in-depth, individual interviews.

Date: 07/01/19 - 6/30/21
Amount: $107,621.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Interior (DOI)

Declining hunting participation negatively impacts state and federal agencies’ ability to achieve wildlife management objectives and generate revenue for conservation activities. The decline is driven, in large part, by decreasing numbers of young adult hunters. Our study will focus on one particularly promising audience - college students – in an attempt to reverse these declines. We will addressing NCN #9 by identifying opportunities for recruiting new hunters as well as retaining or reactivating individuals with previous hunting experience. To accomplish this, we will work with multiple state agencies and public universities in two-phased project. First, we will survey diverse undergraduate students at participating universities to assess their hunting-related perceptions and behaviors and highlight potential R3 programming and outreach opportunities targeting specific subgroups. Second, we will utilize this information to develop, implement, and evaluate R3 workshops for college students without (or with very little) previous hunting experience. Our goal is to reveal best practices for cultivating and sustaining positive perceptions of and participation in hunting across different geographical and cultural contexts. Results shared via a Practitioner’s Guide (with suggested R3 Program Outline), academic publications/presentation, and workshops will help agency professionals, educators, and researchers understand and connect with young adult audiences.  

Date: 04/15/19 - 7/30/20
Amount: $25,979.00
Funding Agencies: North Carolina Youth Camp Association

Organized camping is an important contribution to the outdoor economy across the state of North Carolina. The North Carolina Youth Camp Association has requested a study of the impacts of this industry in the state of North Carolina, including three geographic regions, and for counties that contain multiple camps. This study will utilize survey data collected from camp directors, camp staff, and camp families to provide analysis of the economic impact of organized camping at the state, regional, and county level as well as an understanding of the industry’s social and environmental impacts.

Date: 01/01/18 - 6/30/20
Amount: $122,183.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Interior (DOI)

Declining hunting participation negatively impacts state and federal agencies’ ability to achieve wildlife management objectives and generate revenue for conservation activities. The decline is driven, in large part, by decreasing numbers of young adult hunters. Our study will focus on one particularly promising audience - college students – in an attempt to reverse these declines. We will addressing NCN #9 by identifying opportunities for recruiting new hunters as well as retaining or reactivating individuals with previous hunting experience. To accomplish this, we will work with multiple state agencies and public universities in two-phased project. First, we will survey diverse undergraduate students at participating universities to assess their hunting-related perceptions and behaviors and highlight potential R3 programming and outreach opportunities targeting specific subgroups. Second, we will utilize this information to develop, implement, and evaluate R3 workshops for college students without (or with very little) previous hunting experience. Our goal is to reveal best practices for cultivating and sustaining positive perceptions of and participation in hunting across different geographical and cultural contexts. Results shared via a Practitioner’s Guide (with suggested R3 Program Outline), academic publications/presentation, and workshops will help agency professionals, educators, and researchers understand and connect with young adult audiences.  


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