Wildlife Management and Conservation Biology

bird watching

Addressing Grand Challenges in Conservation

Forest landowners in the United States rank wildlife as their number one land management interest, while hunters and wildlife watchers contribute millions of dollars to the regional and national economy. In this rapidly changing world, wildlife are key indicators of ecosystem health in the face of global change, and the needs of wildlife and humans must be reconciled in the face of sprawling suburban landscapes.

Our Wildlife Management and Conservation Biology program is among the strongest in the nation, ranked second nationally for research productivity in 2014. Building on our strong disciplinary foundations, faculty and students often employ complex interdisciplinary strategies to address conservation challenges through our research strengths in public science, global change, and wildlife, human dimensions of wildlife, mammalogy, movement ecology, quantitative wildlife ecology, urban wildlife ecology, and wildlife/zoonotic disease ecology.

Meet Our Wildlife Management and Conservation Biology Faculty

Interested in Wildlife Management and Conservation Biology research? Contact our faculty to learn more and get involved.